Examining the Four Freedoms of FDR on WNYC

  Quick Post: Listen to John Hockenberry in a series exploring the Four Freedoms as defined by FDR in January 1941 as: Freedom of speech Freedom of worship Freedom from want Freedom from fear Not only did this State of the Union Address create, in a way. a new foreign relations doctrine as he presented them, it was seen by  and is still seen by many as a FDR’s doctrine for life in the United States.   How and where does FDR’s speech reach Asian Americans? Has the nation lived up to the promise of being free from fear? The irony is not lost on the reader of history, nor the guests Mr.

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For Sikhs in Canada, the Wait is Over

  ” More than just an isolated “incident”, The Komagata Maru story reflects a deliberate, exclusionary policy of the Canadian government to keep out ethnicities with whom it deemed unfit to enter. These justifications were couched in racist and ethnocentric views of “progress”, “civilization”, and “suitability” which all buttressed the view that Canada should remain a “White Man’s Country”. On May 23, 1914, a crowded ship from Hong Kong carrying 376 passengers, most being immigrants from Punjab, British India, arrived in Vancouver’s Burrard Inlet on the west coast of the Dominion of Canada.” — http://komagatamarujourney.ca/incident — read more about the incident This event has left a noticeable scar on the Sikh communities living throughout the

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Alaskeros: Filipino Cannery Workers in Alaska

RESEARCH Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project Links “Cannery Workers’ and Farm Laborers’ Union 1933-1939: Their Strength and Unity” by Crystal Fresco The United States took possession of the Philippines in 1898 and in the decades after that, Filipinos, mostly men, began to make their way to America to seek employment, especially in the fields and canneries. In 1933 some of these men formed the first Filipino-led union ever organized in the United States: the Cannery Workers’ and Farm Labors’ Union Local 18257. Based in Seattle, it was organized by “Alaskeros” who worked in the Alaska salmon canneries each summer and in the harvest fields of Washington, Oregon, and

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Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers by Zhi Lin

Koplin Del Rio is pleased to debut a new series of work by Zhi Lin, titled Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers. The exhibition comprises an extensive series of small studies as well as large format drawings executed in Chinese Ink. This provocative body of work is intended to enlighten and document an aspect in American history that has for the most part, been cruelly ignored and forgotten, the brutal treatment that Chinese immigrants endured in building the epic Trans-continental railroad that spans the United States. Between the years of 2005-2007, Zhi Lin took several research trips following the railroad lines through California and Wyoming as well as attending

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The Filipinos in the Field: The Lesser Known History of the Farmworkers Union

NBCNEWS:  “Eclipsed by Cesar Chavez, Larry Itliong’s Story Now Emerges” “Ask members of the Filipino American National Historical Society and they will say the Delano Grape strike of 1965 — the grape boycott that neatly tied together civil rights and labor rights in America—should be known as the revolution of Larry Itliong. Instead, the strike that changed the world’s view on farm labor is more commonly known in history as the movement that made Cesar Chavez an international labor hero. To mark 50 years since the week after the strike vote by Filipinos (Sept. 7th), and their bold first step to walk off the fields (Sept. 8), nearly 500 people

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Taking on the Bully: A Weekly Series

Wing Chong Luke lived through bullying as a young Chinese American boy growing up in Seattle. In his own unique way, he dealt a peaceful blow to the bullies tormenting him daily. How? He made them respect him. Many Asian and Pacific Islander children endure bullying and other forms of violence every day. Not all of them are able to find friends and teachers to stand up for them, and others feel powerless to take on a bully by themselves. We are dedicating a weekly post on this site for the next year that addresses issues of bullying and violence, actions that students can take to create safe schools, and activities teachers

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How Birthright Citizenship Became A Constitutional Right

“March 28, 1898 United States v. Kim Wong Ark— This landmark Supreme Court case extended the protections of the 14th Amendment to all who were born in the U.S. regardless of the Chinese Exclusion Act. King Wong Ark, who was born in San Francisco to Chinese parents, attempted to return to the United States from a visit to China and was denied entry based on his lack of citizenship. The ruling of the court case was a significant victory for Chinese Americans and allowed this marginalized community to expand and flourish.” — From Belonging, Wing Luke Museum Following the Geary Act– this check on the U.S. Constitution should have been a

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