Taking On the Bully #3: How We Unintentionally Support The Bully

As good as our intentions may be, the way we address bullying may actually encourage more bullying. When two children at recess get into an altercation, a bully and the student they repeatedly target, we see teachers or administrators place the two of them in a room for mediation. This often communicates that little to no discipline will occur and the bully can repeat his or her actions. Sometimes this sends a signal to other students that they may be able to get away with the same level of bullying. For the child targeted by the bully, it may signal that they have little to no support from teachers and school administrators. For other

Read more

Meet Shiro Kashino: World War II Veteran and Hero

  In 1943, despite their incarceration in numerous concentration camps throughout America, 4,000 Japanese Americans volunteered to fight in the war against the Axis powers. Compiled into a stunning graphic novel, 6 veterans’ stories take on a whole new life; trying to make sense of personal sacrifice, family honor and bravery. Here is an animated version of the Shiro Kashino story. The full graphic novel is available for sale and the corresponding curriculum guide can be found here. The novel is appropriate for 5th graders and above, though teachers may use their discretion in presenting this material to 4th grade students. The museum helps students explore the experiences of Japanese Americans during the war

Read more

Alaskeros: Filipino Cannery Workers in Alaska

RESEARCH Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project Links “Cannery Workers’ and Farm Laborers’ Union 1933-1939: Their Strength and Unity” by Crystal Fresco The United States took possession of the Philippines in 1898 and in the decades after that, Filipinos, mostly men, began to make their way to America to seek employment, especially in the fields and canneries. In 1933 some of these men formed the first Filipino-led union ever organized in the United States: the Cannery Workers’ and Farm Labors’ Union Local 18257. Based in Seattle, it was organized by “Alaskeros” who worked in the Alaska salmon canneries each summer and in the harvest fields of Washington, Oregon, and

Read more

Taking On The Bully #2

“When children are singled out because of a shared characteristic — such as race, sexual orientation, or religion — or a perceived shared characteristic, the issue not only affects that individual but the entire community. Policymakers believe that AAPI students who are bullied face unique challenges, including religious, cultural, and language barriers. In addition, there has been a spike of racial hostility following the September 11 attacks against children perceived to be Muslim. The classroom should be the safest place for youth, but for some AAPI students, it can be a very dangerous environment. — Kiran Ahuja, Executive Director White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Here is a video

Read more

Colors of Confinement: Photography by Bill Manbo

LATIMES: “In the photo, a young boy hangs on a fence. His face is partially obscured; his eyes hover just above his bent knuckles. His stance is playful. On first impression, he looks like any kid in the middle of play. The background, however, tells another story. Receding endlessly into the horizon are the rows of barracks of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, a World War II Japanese internment camp near Cody, Wyo. During the three years it was open, August 1942 to November 1945, Heart Mountain held more than 14,000 people of Japanese ancestry. Many of them were American citizens. All of them — mechanics, farmers, green grocers, small

Read more

Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers by Zhi Lin

Koplin Del Rio is pleased to debut a new series of work by Zhi Lin, titled Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers. The exhibition comprises an extensive series of small studies as well as large format drawings executed in Chinese Ink. This provocative body of work is intended to enlighten and document an aspect in American history that has for the most part, been cruelly ignored and forgotten, the brutal treatment that Chinese immigrants endured in building the epic Trans-continental railroad that spans the United States. Between the years of 2005-2007, Zhi Lin took several research trips following the railroad lines through California and Wyoming as well as attending

Read more

The Filipinos in the Field: The Lesser Known History of the Farmworkers Union

NBCNEWS:  “Eclipsed by Cesar Chavez, Larry Itliong’s Story Now Emerges” “Ask members of the Filipino American National Historical Society and they will say the Delano Grape strike of 1965 — the grape boycott that neatly tied together civil rights and labor rights in America—should be known as the revolution of Larry Itliong. Instead, the strike that changed the world’s view on farm labor is more commonly known in history as the movement that made Cesar Chavez an international labor hero. To mark 50 years since the week after the strike vote by Filipinos (Sept. 7th), and their bold first step to walk off the fields (Sept. 8), nearly 500 people

Read more