Educational Standards by Grade Level

The lesson plans on this site are written to be compatible with the following educational standards:

Washington State Social Studies Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALR) and Grade Level Expectation (GLE) standards are considered in selecting learning contents.

According to EALRs, adolescent students are ready to deepen their understanding of the Earth and its peoples through the study of history, geography, politics, culture, and economic systems.

We have provided a series of matrices that connect the classroom curriculum housed on this site with museum-based learning experiences that further support student instruction and learning.

Kindergarten

Corresponding GLE/ Common Core Standards Description of GLE/ Common Core Standard Objectives Classroom Curriculum Tour and Museum Activity Experiences Possible Museum and Neighborhood Locations
1.1.2 Applies the ideals of justice and fairness when making choices or decisions in the classroom or on the playground. Put in context the ways Asian and Pacific Islanders kept their traditions even though they had to follow strict rules. Lunar New Year Tours Inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood; Guided Tours and Art Projects Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel;
4.1.1 Understands and creates timelines to show personal events in a sequential manner. Connect students with the idea of a journey by sharing how they felt at each stage of getting ready for school, arriving at school and entering their classroom. Lunar New Year Tours Inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood; Guided Tours and Art Projects Yick Fung Co.
5.1.2 Evaluates the fairness of one’s point of view. Students learn to express their opinion on whether or not children should be allowed to immigrate or be citizens. Lunar New Year Tours Inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood; Guided Tours and Art Projects Yick Fung Co.
5.2.1 Understands how to ask questions about the classroom and school community. Cultural traditions; Community beliefs; Connections between America and place of birth; Teaching younger generations. Lunar New Year Traditions; New Year Traditions, Games and Food Lunar New Year Tours Inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood; Guided Tours and Art Projects Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; China Town Gate; Zodiac Tiles; Museum Activities and Gallery Tour
5.4.1 Retells and explains personal history. Students ask their parents three questions about their family history and share with their classmates. Lunar New Year Tours Inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood; Art Projects Museum Activities; Museum Learning Studio

First Grade

2.1.1 Understands that when
individuals and families make choices about meeting their needs and wants, something is gained and something is given up.
Basic understanding of push-pull factors in immigration as they pertain directly to a family or individual within a family’s experience. Kinetic museum  activities, exploring artifacts in Yick Fung Co. and Freeman Hotel to see examples of what people brought across the ocean. Yick Fung Co.
3.1.1 Understands and uses maps and globes to identify major bodies of water and continental land masses. Interact with a map of the Pacific Rim to see the routes taken to Seattle, Vancouver B.C. and San Francisco. Kinetic museum  activities, exploring artifacts in Yick Fung Co. and Freeman Hotel to see examples of what people brought across the ocean.
3.2.1 Understands that the way families live is shaped by the environment. Understand how the restrictions placed on Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants led to creative ways in creating a new home. Lunar New Year Tours inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood Yick Fung Co.; Canton Alley: Apartment #6
3.2.3 Understands why families make decisions to move. Challenge students to think about the basic things all people need or may want. Have them explore what their parent/s do to help the family be happy. Kinetic museum  activities, exploring artifacts in Yick Fung Co. and Freeman Hotel to see examples of what people brought across the ocean. Freeman Hotel
4.1.1 Understands and creates family timelines to show events in a sequential manner. Connect students with the idea of a journey by sharing how they felt at each stage of getting ready for school, arriving at school and entering their classroom. Kinetic museum  activities, exploring artifacts in Yick Fung Co. and Freeman Hotel to see examples of what people brought across the ocean. Freeman Hotel
4.4.1 Understands how knowledge of family history can be used to
make current choices.
How we take care of our elders. Kinetic museum  activities, exploring artifacts in Yick Fung Co. and Freeman Hotel to see examples of what people brought across the ocean. Nikkei Concerns
5.2.1 Understands how questions are used to find out information. How do celebrate? How do your classmates celebrate? Lunar New Year Tours inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; China Town Gate; Zodiac Tiles; Museum Activities and Gallery Tour
5.2.2/ RL.1.10 Uses texts and visuals to identify the main ideas or key details to study family life. Students will find commonalities in different families lives; identify how families are different through stories and poetry. Lunar New Year Tours inside Yick Fung Co.; Freeman Hotel; Neighborhood Canton Alley: Apartment #6; Neighborhood Locations

Second Grade

1.2.1 Understands the basic organization of government in the community. Students explore the structure of family associations and other community institutions in their communities as well as in Chinese American communities.
1.4.1 Understands that citizenship and civic involvement in the neighborhood and community are the rights and responsibilities of individuals. Students experience stories of real people,  in their words when possible, on how they and others helped fight for the rights of everyone in the community.
2.2.1/RL.2.3 Understands the basic elements of a community’s economic system, including producers, distributors, and consumers of goods and services. Yick Fung; Freeman Hotel; Tsue Chong Fortune Cookie Factory
3.1.2 Understands the physical
characteristics of places in the community.
3.2.1 Understands that people in communities affect the environment as they meet their needs and wants. Students identify what things they need or want in a community and connect those ideas with how immigrant and refugee communities.
4.2.1 Understands individuals who have shaped history in the local community.
5..1.1 Understands multiple points of view on issues in the community.
5.3.1 Engages in discussions to learn about different points of view on issues.

Third Grade

1.1.1 Understands the key ideals of unity and diversity.
1.1.2 Understands and applies the key ideals of unity and diversity within the context of the community.
3.1.2 Understands the physical, political, and cultural characteristics of places, regions, and people in North America including the location of the fifty states within the regions of the U.S.
3.3.1 Understands that learning about the geography of North America helps us understand the global issue of culture.
3.2.2 Understands the cultural
universals of place, time, family life, economics,
communication, arts,
recreation, food, clothing,
shelter, transportation,
government, and education.
4.2.2/W.3.1/W.3.7 Understands how contributions made by various cultural groups have shaped the history of the community and world. Explore and identify three ways Japanese Americans strengthened agriculture in Washington and Oregon. JA-Immigration and Settlement “Oysters, Salad Greens, Pike Place Market and the Bing Cherry”

Fourth Grade

Exploring the PNW Prior to Statehood
2.1.1 Understands and analyzes the costs and benefits of people’s decisions to move and relocate to meet their needs and wants. Japanese immigrants formed vibrant and thriving communities despite discriminatory attitudes and laws. Learning how their experiences differed from other immigrants allows students a deeper understanding of immigration past and present.
3.1.1 Constructs and uses maps to explain the movement of people.
3.2.3 Understands that the geographic features of the Pacific Northwest have influenced the movement of people.
4.3.1 Understands that there are multiple perspectives regarding the interpretation of historical events and creates an historical account using multiple sources.
Living in Washington– Geography, Resources and the Economy
2.2.1 Understands the basic
elements of Washington
State’s economic system, including agriculture, businesses, industry, natural resources, and labor.
Explore and identify three ways Japanese Americans, Chinese Americans and Filipinos strengthened industries in the Pacific Northwest. JA-Immigration and Settlement “Oysters, Salad Greens, Pike Place Market and the Bing Cherry”
2.2.2 Understands that the
economy in Washington
State relies on trade with Pacific Rim countries.
Students explore the complex demands for immigrant labor in the Railroad, Cannery, and Farming industries. Workers Needed,              Workers Denied
2.4.1/ W.4.1 Understands how geography, natural resources, climate, and
available labor contribute to the sustainability of the economy of regions in Washington State.
Japanese immigrants formed vibrant and thriving communities despite discriminatory attitudes and laws. Learning how their experiences differed from other immigrants allows students a deeper understanding of immigration past and present. Workers Needed,              Workers Denied
Being Citizens in WA
1.1.1 Understands the key ideal of rights set forth in Article I of the Washington State Constitution.
1.4.1 Understands that civic participation involves being informed about public issues and voting in elections.
4.4.1/SL4.1 Understands that significant historical events in Washington State have implications for current decisions.

Fifth Grade

1.1.2 Evaluates how a public issue is related to constitutional rights
and the common good.
Japanese Americans and the Constitution; Japanese Americans Look Back and Post 911 Issues.
1.4.1 Understands that civic
participation involves being informed about how public issues are related to rights and
responsibilities.
Japanese Americans and the Constitution; Japanese Americans Look Back and Post 911 Issues
4.4.1 Understands that significant historical events in the United
States have implications for current decisions and influence the future.
Students begin to examine the legacy of the Incarceration through recent historical events and the impacts of communities today. Japanese Americans and the Constitution; Japanese Americans Look Back and Post 911 Issues Guest Speakers from Sikh community, Arab community, Survivors of the Incarceration, Historic Hotel, Neighborhood tour of Nihonmachi Issei Room, Nippon Kan Scrim, Panama Hotel, Chiyo’s Garden, Higo
5.1.2 Evaluates the relevance of facts used in forming a position on an issue or event. Japanese Americans and the Constitution; Japanese Americans Look Back and Post 911 Issues
5.3.1 Engages others in discussions that attempt to clarify and address multiple viewpoints on
public issues based on key ideals.
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