As good as our intentions may be, the way we address bullying may actually encourage more bullying. When two children at recess get into an altercation, a bully and the student they repeatedly target, we see teachers or administrators place the two of them in a room for mediation. This often communicates that little to no discipline will occur and the bully can repeat his or her actions. Sometimes this sends a signal to other students that they may be able to get away with the same level of bullying. For the child targeted by the bully, it may signal that they have little to no support from teachers and school administrators. For other …

“When children are singled out because of a shared characteristic — such as race, sexual orientation, or religion — or a perceived shared characteristic, the issue not only affects that individual but the entire community. Policymakers believe that AAPI students who are bullied face unique challenges, including religious, cultural, and language barriers. In addition, there has been a spike of racial hostility following the September 11 attacks against children perceived to be Muslim. The classroom should be the safest place for youth, but for some AAPI students, it can be a very dangerous environment. — Kiran Ahuja, Executive Director White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Here is a video …

Wing Chong Luke lived through bullying as a young Chinese American boy growing up in Seattle. In his own unique way, he dealt a peaceful blow to the bullies tormenting him daily. How? He made them respect him. Many Asian and Pacific Islander children endure bullying and other forms of violence every day. Not all of them are able to find friends and teachers to stand up for them, and others feel powerless to take on a bully by themselves. We are dedicating a weekly post on this site for the next year that addresses issues of bullying and violence, actions that students can take to create safe schools, and activities teachers …