[Read Alyssa Aquino’s article: http://fpif.org/undocumented-filipinos-are-living-a-special-nightmare-in-trumps-america] Surprising numbers of undocumented immigrants are coming from Asia. Filipinos are one such group. Many US residents simply do not realize that the annual limit on permanent resident visas has put some families and individuals waiting for a decade or more. Using simple arithmetic, one can determine that a family reunification visa applicant from the Philippines could potentially wait over 20 years before the pending application is approved. A long-standing relationship between the nation of the Philippines and the US began with the end of the Spanish American War. Student called Pensionados arrived first; welcome and even sponsored to come study at US Universities. Laborers …

Explore the top countries of origin for immigrants in each state from 1850 to 2013. Source: From Ireland to Germany to Italy to Mexico: How America’s Source of Immigrants Has Changed in the States, 1850 – 2013

From the San Francisco Chronicle: June 12, 2016 Letters Home: Asian Americans in Support of Black Lives Matter “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk. You may not have grown up around people who are black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.” So begins a powerful letter involving hundreds of Asian American collaborators from across the country in support of the Black Lives Matter, co-written in the aftermath of last week’s fatal shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and five Dallas police …

When Bruce Lee spoke with Pierre Burton on Canadian Television he made one thing clear: He would show Hollywood an authentic; a true Asian. In many ways he fought that battle inside and outside of the industry. On screen and off. In the 40 years since his death, we have hashtag campaigns to call out the race issues with the 2016 Oscars, and yet the dialogue on race is still simplified to black, white and when noted– brown (Latino)

What role do pop stars and celebrities play in breaking through glass ceilings, and more importantly, in changing our society? If media depictions of different ethnic communities continually reinforce racial and gender stereotypes– then why should we rely on media to paint the whole picture? Students have an opportunity to raise thee questions and even explore analyzing the media in your classroom. Check out this lesson from our Honoring Our Journey set: Lesson 4 

Teachers will need to scale the activity for younger grades– for the record– we have had wonderful dialogues with 3rd graders on the role of media.

Email us if you want to bounce ideas off of us or talk through using the lesson in your classroom rgupta@wingluke.org

NBCNEWS:  “Eclipsed by Cesar Chavez, Larry Itliong’s Story Now Emerges” “Ask members of the Filipino American National Historical Society and they will say the Delano Grape strike of 1965 — the grape boycott that neatly tied together civil rights and labor rights in America—should be known as the revolution of Larry Itliong. Instead, the strike that changed the world’s view on farm labor is more commonly known in history as the movement that made Cesar Chavez an international labor hero. To mark 50 years since the week after the strike vote by Filipinos (Sept. 7th), and their bold first step to walk off the fields (Sept. 8), nearly 500 people …

If there is one thing we teach here at the Wing Luke Museum– it is that histories are never definitive. We have designed this presentation to highlight some events in the Asian and Pacific American timeline. We should always keep in mind that the details here are as much a part of American History as the suffragettes, abolitionists, civil rights struggle, and sock hops. The image should take any classroom directly to the presentation. To play– click play. Use the right and left arrow keys to navigate the presentation. This timeline can be used for any grade level.

HÅLE’-KU dåkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho) www.infinitedakota.com Linalai (Chant) Born in Snohomish territory and raised in Swinomish and Duwamish territories, of Ilokano (Vigan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines) and Taotao Håya Chamoru (Mongmong & Tumhom/Tumon villages in Guåhan, Marianas Islands) ancestry, my name is dåkkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho), and I am currently living in Lenapehoking (New York City), land of the Lenni Lenape. I sing this lålai chant in honor of the first peoples of the planet, the guardians of the earth awakened and awakening to the indigenous mind. I sing this lålai in honor of the lands I’ve walked through in the footsteps of the ancestors who have embraced mine. I sing this lålai …