Lost Story of “Citizen Kahn” (from the New Yorker)

Memory is a fickle thing. “Hot Tamale Louie was the son of nobody knows who, the grandson of nobody knows who, and the great-great-grandson of nobody knows who. He had been selling tamales in Sheridan since Buffalo Bill rode in the town parade, sold them when President Taft came to visit, was still selling them when the Russians sent Sputnik into space and the British sent the Beatles to America. By then, Louie was a local legend, and his murder shocked everyone.” How quickly the town forgot that he was Muslim and a cherished neighbor.   http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/06/06/zarif-khans-tamales-and-the-muslims-of-sheridan-wyoming

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Attempting to Close a “Gene-race-nal” Gap

From the San Francisco Chronicle: June 12, 2016 Letters Home: Asian Americans in Support of Black Lives Matter “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk. You may not have grown up around people who are black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.” So begins a powerful letter involving hundreds of Asian American collaborators from across the country in support of the Black Lives Matter, co-written in the aftermath of last week’s fatal shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and five Dallas police

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Alaskeros: Filipino Cannery Workers in Alaska

RESEARCH Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project Links “Cannery Workers’ and Farm Laborers’ Union 1933-1939: Their Strength and Unity” by Crystal Fresco The United States took possession of the Philippines in 1898 and in the decades after that, Filipinos, mostly men, began to make their way to America to seek employment, especially in the fields and canneries. In 1933 some of these men formed the first Filipino-led union ever organized in the United States: the Cannery Workers’ and Farm Labors’ Union Local 18257. Based in Seattle, it was organized by “Alaskeros” who worked in the Alaska salmon canneries each summer and in the harvest fields of Washington, Oregon, and

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