[Read Alyssa Aquino’s article: http://fpif.org/undocumented-filipinos-are-living-a-special-nightmare-in-trumps-america] Surprising numbers of undocumented immigrants are coming from Asia. Filipinos are one such group. Many US residents simply do not realize that the annual limit on permanent resident visas has put some families and individuals waiting for a decade or more. Using simple arithmetic, one can determine that a family reunification visa applicant from the Philippines could potentially wait over 20 years before the pending application is approved. A long-standing relationship between the nation of the Philippines and the US began with the end of the Spanish American War. Student called Pensionados arrived first; welcome and even sponsored to come study at US Universities. Laborers …

2017 marks 75 years since the first Japanese Americans we forced into assembly centers and then to concentration camps throughout the United States. Here in Western Washington American citizens and their parents were held at the Puyallup Fairgrounds– renamed Camp Harmony and then most were sent to Minidoka camp in Idaho. “Except in Portland, Pinedale, Sacramento, and Mayer, large fairground or racetracks were selected to minimize the need for building extra housing. At the racetracks, stables were cleaned out for use as living quarters. At the Portland Assembly Center over 3,800 evacuees were housed under one roof in a livestock pavilion subdivided into apartments.” (Densho Project Website) Tanforan was a racetrack. When we …

In 2006, following hurricanes Katrina and Rita, New Orleans was a ghost town. In the 9th Ward, houses stood empty as the families who had lived in them for generations fled, were rescued from, or were lost in the surge of water as it breached the levees. Following the 1975 Fall of Saigon, thousands of Vietnamese refugees settled throughout the United States. Here in the Pacific Northwest it was a tough process to find homes. In New Orleans; the story was no different. In the Parish of Versailles, the Vietnamese took to fishing, shrimping and other industries in the region. The communities they built up relied heavily on community cohesion and …

From the San Francisco Chronicle: June 12, 2016 Letters Home: Asian Americans in Support of Black Lives Matter “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk. You may not have grown up around people who are black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.” So begins a powerful letter involving hundreds of Asian American collaborators from across the country in support of the Black Lives Matter, co-written in the aftermath of last week’s fatal shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and five Dallas police …

When Bruce Lee spoke with Pierre Burton on Canadian Television he made one thing clear: He would show Hollywood an authentic; a true Asian. In many ways he fought that battle inside and outside of the industry. On screen and off. In the 40 years since his death, we have hashtag campaigns to call out the race issues with the 2016 Oscars, and yet the dialogue on race is still simplified to black, white and when noted– brown (Latino)

What role do pop stars and celebrities play in breaking through glass ceilings, and more importantly, in changing our society? If media depictions of different ethnic communities continually reinforce racial and gender stereotypes– then why should we rely on media to paint the whole picture? Students have an opportunity to raise thee questions and even explore analyzing the media in your classroom. Check out this lesson from our Honoring Our Journey set: Lesson 4 

Teachers will need to scale the activity for younger grades– for the record– we have had wonderful dialogues with 3rd graders on the role of media.

Email us if you want to bounce ideas off of us or talk through using the lesson in your classroom rgupta@wingluke.org

  ” More than just an isolated “incident”, The Komagata Maru story reflects a deliberate, exclusionary policy of the Canadian government to keep out ethnicities with whom it deemed unfit to enter. These justifications were couched in racist and ethnocentric views of “progress”, “civilization”, and “suitability” which all buttressed the view that Canada should remain a “White Man’s Country”. On May 23, 1914, a crowded ship from Hong Kong carrying 376 passengers, most being immigrants from Punjab, British India, arrived in Vancouver’s Burrard Inlet on the west coast of the Dominion of Canada.” — http://komagatamarujourney.ca/incident — read more about the incident This event has left a noticeable scar on the Sikh communities living throughout the …