Koplin Del Rio is pleased to debut a new series of work by Zhi Lin, titled Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers. The exhibition comprises an extensive series of small studies as well as large format drawings executed in Chinese Ink. This provocative body of work is intended to enlighten and document an aspect in American history that has for the most part, been cruelly ignored and forgotten, the brutal treatment that Chinese immigrants endured in building the epic Trans-continental railroad that spans the United States. Between the years of 2005-2007, Zhi Lin took several research trips following the railroad lines through California and Wyoming as well as attending …

If there is one thing we teach here at the Wing Luke Museum– it is that histories are never definitive. We have designed this presentation to highlight some events in the Asian and Pacific American timeline. We should always keep in mind that the details here are as much a part of American History as the suffragettes, abolitionists, civil rights struggle, and sock hops. The image should take any classroom directly to the presentation. To play– click play. Use the right and left arrow keys to navigate the presentation. This timeline can be used for any grade level.

“March 28, 1898 United States v. Kim Wong Ark— This landmark Supreme Court case extended the protections of the 14th Amendment to all who were born in the U.S. regardless of the Chinese Exclusion Act. King Wong Ark, who was born in San Francisco to Chinese parents, attempted to return to the United States from a visit to China and was denied entry based on his lack of citizenship. The ruling of the court case was a significant victory for Chinese Americans and allowed this marginalized community to expand and flourish.” — From Belonging, Wing Luke Museum Following the Geary Act– this check on the U.S. Constitution should have been a …

HÅLE’-KU dåkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho) www.infinitedakota.com Linalai (Chant) Born in Snohomish territory and raised in Swinomish and Duwamish territories, of Ilokano (Vigan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines) and Taotao Håya Chamoru (Mongmong & Tumhom/Tumon villages in Guåhan, Marianas Islands) ancestry, my name is dåkkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho), and I am currently living in Lenapehoking (New York City), land of the Lenni Lenape. I sing this lålai chant in honor of the first peoples of the planet, the guardians of the earth awakened and awakening to the indigenous mind. I sing this lålai in honor of the lands I’ve walked through in the footsteps of the ancestors who have embraced mine. I sing this lålai …

One of Seattle’s first Chinese immigrants, Chin Gee Hee, lead a particularly nuanced life. He arrived to Seattle in the early 1860s. He partnered with Chin Chun Hock to start the Wa Chong Company. They supplied many items including rice, teas and more. The company also supplied labor to industries such as the railroads. 12,000 Chinese men helped build America’s railroad system. It is said by Chin Gee Hee’s descendants that he was at the hammering of the Golden Spike. In time he was wooed back to China, to invest in infrastructure that would build China’s future in a more modern, industrial world. And so he built the Sun Ning Railroad Company.