Lost Story of “Citizen Kahn” (from the New Yorker)

Memory is a fickle thing. “Hot Tamale Louie was the son of nobody knows who, the grandson of nobody knows who, and the great-great-grandson of nobody knows who. He had been selling tamales in Sheridan since Buffalo Bill rode in the town parade, sold them when President Taft came to visit, was still selling them when the Russians sent Sputnik into space and the British sent the Beatles to America. By then, Louie was a local legend, and his murder shocked everyone.” How quickly the town forgot that he was Muslim and a cherished neighbor.   http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/06/06/zarif-khans-tamales-and-the-muslims-of-sheridan-wyoming

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“From a Docent” Blog: Our Ed Team’s Way of Talking Off Hours

One might think after talking history, social studies, immigration policy and more to and thousands (and thousands) of visitors each year, the Education Team might take a break and do something else with their lives. We do– but we also obsessively help each other out. Our internal blog connects each interpretive guide with resources, ideas, storytelling techniques as a means of peer-to-peer learning. It gives us a chance to continually expand the canvases on which we paint the nuances of history. Lately, it seems the New Yorker has had a lot of relevant articles and essays. By no means is this an endorsement of that publication– but they have been doing their part

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Examining the Four Freedoms of FDR on WNYC

  Quick Post: Listen to John Hockenberry in a series exploring the Four Freedoms as defined by FDR in January 1941 as: Freedom of speech Freedom of worship Freedom from want Freedom from fear Not only did this State of the Union Address create, in a way. a new foreign relations doctrine as he presented them, it was seen by  and is still seen by many as a FDR’s doctrine for life in the United States.   How and where does FDR’s speech reach Asian Americans? Has the nation lived up to the promise of being free from fear? The irony is not lost on the reader of history, nor the guests Mr.

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For Sikhs in Canada, the Wait is Over

  ” More than just an isolated “incident”, The Komagata Maru story reflects a deliberate, exclusionary policy of the Canadian government to keep out ethnicities with whom it deemed unfit to enter. These justifications were couched in racist and ethnocentric views of “progress”, “civilization”, and “suitability” which all buttressed the view that Canada should remain a “White Man’s Country”. On May 23, 1914, a crowded ship from Hong Kong carrying 376 passengers, most being immigrants from Punjab, British India, arrived in Vancouver’s Burrard Inlet on the west coast of the Dominion of Canada.” — http://komagatamarujourney.ca/incident — read more about the incident This event has left a noticeable scar on the Sikh communities living throughout the

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Meet Shiro Kashino: World War II Veteran and Hero

  In 1943, despite their incarceration in numerous concentration camps throughout America, 4,000 Japanese Americans volunteered to fight in the war against the Axis powers. Compiled into a stunning graphic novel, 6 veterans’ stories take on a whole new life; trying to make sense of personal sacrifice, family honor and bravery. Here is an animated version of the Shiro Kashino story. The full graphic novel is available for sale and the corresponding curriculum guide can be found here. The novel is appropriate for 5th graders and above, though teachers may use their discretion in presenting this material to 4th grade students. The museum helps students explore the experiences of Japanese Americans during the war

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Colors of Confinement: Photography by Bill Manbo

LATIMES: “In the photo, a young boy hangs on a fence. His face is partially obscured; his eyes hover just above his bent knuckles. His stance is playful. On first impression, he looks like any kid in the middle of play. The background, however, tells another story. Receding endlessly into the horizon are the rows of barracks of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, a World War II Japanese internment camp near Cody, Wyo. During the three years it was open, August 1942 to November 1945, Heart Mountain held more than 14,000 people of Japanese ancestry. Many of them were American citizens. All of them — mechanics, farmers, green grocers, small

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How Birthright Citizenship Became A Constitutional Right

“March 28, 1898 United States v. Kim Wong Ark— This landmark Supreme Court case extended the protections of the 14th Amendment to all who were born in the U.S. regardless of the Chinese Exclusion Act. King Wong Ark, who was born in San Francisco to Chinese parents, attempted to return to the United States from a visit to China and was denied entry based on his lack of citizenship. The ruling of the court case was a significant victory for Chinese Americans and allowed this marginalized community to expand and flourish.” — From Belonging, Wing Luke Museum Following the Geary Act– this check on the U.S. Constitution should have been a

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