The 1992 LA Riots: 20/20 Hindsight and the Korean American Community

““If the African American community and the Korean community had been communicating in 1992, the pain, agony and anger felt by both communities might have been avoided,” Laura Jeon, President of the Korean American Federation of Los Angeles, told the gathering.– Asian American News  

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Meet Yuh-Line Niou: First Asian-American to Represent Chinatown, NYC

She trained here,studied here, got her footing here in Seattle. The influence of so many longstanding Asian Pacific American mentors within social justice movements has changed the way younger APAs see themselves in positions of influence. Go Yuh-Line! (She was also my neighbor for many years here in Ballard.)   Questions to ask students: What is an elected representative? What should an elected representative be like? How do you choose the right candidate for you?   Here are a few easy and free lesson plans we find useful: https://www.teachervision.com/democracy/lesson-plan/2699.html https://printables.scholastic.com/content/stores/printables/priv/69/9780545041669-009.pdf (This is a simple Venn diagram activity that allows students to understand where candidates share opinions and societal values, and what

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Memory and Renewal: Tanforan Assembly Center

2017 marks 75 years since the first Japanese Americans we forced into assembly centers and then to concentration camps throughout the United States. Here in Western Washington American citizens and their parents were held at the Puyallup Fairgrounds– renamed Camp Harmony and then most were sent to Minidoka camp in Idaho. “Except in Portland, Pinedale, Sacramento, and Mayer, large fairground or racetracks were selected to minimize the need for building extra housing. At the racetracks, stables were cleaned out for use as living quarters. At the Portland Assembly Center over 3,800 evacuees were housed under one roof in a livestock pavilion subdivided into apartments.” (Densho Project Website) Tanforan was a racetrack. When we

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A Season to Vote

    “The Asian-American voter pool is remarkably diverse, ranging from Pakistanis and Indians to Chinese and Koreans.” That is the ethnic breakdown in the state of Virginia in an article from the Wall Street Journal. In Washington State we would add the populations from the Pacific Islands as well. This means the diversity of the Asian and Pacific American voting public is as varied as any other groups. Outreach by both major political parties will need to contend with this diversity. To the list we can confidently add: Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lao, Japanese, Thai, Sri Lankan, Filipino, Hawaiian, Fijian, Maori, Samoan, Tongan and a dozen other ethnicities. The reality for political

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Attempting to Close a “Gene-race-nal” Gap

From the San Francisco Chronicle: June 12, 2016 Letters Home: Asian Americans in Support of Black Lives Matter “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk. You may not have grown up around people who are black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.” So begins a powerful letter involving hundreds of Asian American collaborators from across the country in support of the Black Lives Matter, co-written in the aftermath of last week’s fatal shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and five Dallas police

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Examining the Four Freedoms of FDR on WNYC

  Quick Post: Listen to John Hockenberry in a series exploring the Four Freedoms as defined by FDR in January 1941 as: Freedom of speech Freedom of worship Freedom from want Freedom from fear Not only did this State of the Union Address create, in a way. a new foreign relations doctrine as he presented them, it was seen by  and is still seen by many as a FDR’s doctrine for life in the United States.   How and where does FDR’s speech reach Asian Americans? Has the nation lived up to the promise of being free from fear? The irony is not lost on the reader of history, nor the guests Mr.

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