From The Conversation, online publication By Jane McAdam “Nauru is best known to most Australians as the remote Pacific island where asylum seekers who arrive by boat are sent. What is less well known is that in the 1960s, the Australian government planned to relocate the entire population of Nauru to an island off the Queensland coast. The irony of this is striking, especially in light of continuing revelations that highlight the non-suitability of Nauru as a host country for refugees. It also provides a cautionary tale for those considering wholesale population relocation as a “solution” for Pacific island communities threatened by the impacts of climate change…” Read More Here or Click …

From The Conversation, online publication By Jane McAdam “On average, one person is displaced each second by a disaster-related hazard. In global terms, that’s about 26 million people a year. Most move within their own countries, but some are forced across international borders. As climate change continues, more frequent and extreme weather events are expected to put more people in harm’s way. In the Pacific region alone, this year’s Cyclone Winston was the strongest ever to hit Fiji, destroying whole villages. Last year, Cyclone Pam displaced thousands of people in Vanuatu and Tuvalu – more than 70% of Vanuatu’s population were left seeking shelter in the storm’s immediate aftermath. However, future human …

RESEARCH Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project Links “Cannery Workers’ and Farm Laborers’ Union 1933-1939: Their Strength and Unity” by Crystal Fresco The United States took possession of the Philippines in 1898 and in the decades after that, Filipinos, mostly men, began to make their way to America to seek employment, especially in the fields and canneries. In 1933 some of these men formed the first Filipino-led union ever organized in the United States: the Cannery Workers’ and Farm Labors’ Union Local 18257. Based in Seattle, it was organized by “Alaskeros” who worked in the Alaska salmon canneries each summer and in the harvest fields of Washington, Oregon, and …

Koplin Del Rio is pleased to debut a new series of work by Zhi Lin, titled Invisible and Unwelcomed People: Chinese Railroad Workers. The exhibition comprises an extensive series of small studies as well as large format drawings executed in Chinese Ink. This provocative body of work is intended to enlighten and document an aspect in American history that has for the most part, been cruelly ignored and forgotten, the brutal treatment that Chinese immigrants endured in building the epic Trans-continental railroad that spans the United States. Between the years of 2005-2007, Zhi Lin took several research trips following the railroad lines through California and Wyoming as well as attending …

Wing Chong Luke lived through bullying as a young Chinese American boy growing up in Seattle. In his own unique way, he dealt a peaceful blow to the bullies tormenting him daily. How? He made them respect him. Many Asian and Pacific Islander children endure bullying and other forms of violence every day. Not all of them are able to find friends and teachers to stand up for them, and others feel powerless to take on a bully by themselves. We are dedicating a weekly post on this site for the next year that addresses issues of bullying and violence, actions that students can take to create safe schools, and activities teachers …

HÅLE’-KU dåkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho) www.infinitedakota.com Linalai (Chant) Born in Snohomish territory and raised in Swinomish and Duwamish territories, of Ilokano (Vigan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines) and Taotao Håya Chamoru (Mongmong & Tumhom/Tumon villages in Guåhan, Marianas Islands) ancestry, my name is dåkkot-ta (dakota alcantara-camacho), and I am currently living in Lenapehoking (New York City), land of the Lenni Lenape. I sing this lålai chant in honor of the first peoples of the planet, the guardians of the earth awakened and awakening to the indigenous mind. I sing this lålai in honor of the lands I’ve walked through in the footsteps of the ancestors who have embraced mine. I sing this lålai …

August 5, 2012 the New York Times reported “In an attack that the police said they were treating as “a domestic terrorist-type incident,” the gunman stalked through the temple around 10:30 a.m. Congregants ran for shelter and barricaded themselves in bathrooms and prayer halls, where they made desperate phone calls and sent anguished texts pleading for help as confusion and fear took hold. Witnesses described a scene of chaos and carnage.” In the days that followed and in the years that have passed, the Sikh community of Oak Creek, WI and their house of worship have been forever changed. Still expressing a love, and a willingness to pray for all …